Google’s New Nest Home Speaker ‘Prince’ Shows up at FCC

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We’ve been watching for the FCC filing ID for the New Nest Home Smart Speaker. I think we’ve found the FCC filing for Google LLC product GXCA6. It was filed on July 8, 2020. However, there are have been reports from a number of sources showing pictures of the new Nest Speaker otherwise known as Prince. It looks like Google’s FCC application for the Nest Home Speaker has a bunch of communication protocols that we should expect. However, it looks like there are some audio upgrades as well based on reports from 9to5Google, but nothing confirmed. You can check it out below.

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Nest Home Smart Speaker FCC Filing

Google LLC filed the product as Google LLC Wireless Device GXCA6, which is short for FCC ID A4RGXCA6. Based on the application numbers, it looks like there are 3 separate communication devices in the new Nest Home Speaker – Prince.

Nest Home “Prince” Operating Frequencies

Based on the information shown from FCC ID.io, the new Nest Home Speaker is going to have both WiFi 2.4 GHz, 5 GHz and operate on radios such as:

  • WLAN 11b/g/n,
  • WLAN 11a/n VHT20/VHT40/VHT80, and
  • Bluetooth BDR/EDR/LE

What is the difference between VHT20, VHT40, and VHT80?

What is the difference between VHT20, VHT40, and VHT80?

The VHT of a signal is the bandwidth where the 2.4 GHz signal resides. VHT20 is considered the sweet spot for 2.4 GHz signals, and VHT40 is considered the sweet spot for 5GHz signals. However, if you really wanted to make sure you had designated connections on 5GHz you could bump that up to VHT80 as shown above or 160 (most recent tech).

In case you’re wondering what VHT means, the VHT of a signal is the bandwidth where the 2.4 GHz signal resides. VHT20 is considered the sweet spot for 2.4 GHz signals, and VHT40 is considered the sweet spot for 5GHz signals. However, if you really wanted to make sure you had designated connections on 5GHz you could bump that up to VHT80 as shown above or 160 (most recent tech). That’s interesting! I think Google will use those special connections to connect to other Nest or Pixel products.

New Nest Home Speaker Codename Prince

That’s all we have so far on the upcoming Nest Home Speaker. It does not have a name yet, other than Codename Prince. Although, Prince would be cool. 9to5Google made mention that there should be upgraded speakers vs. the Google Home Hub, however, I have not seen any evidence of what the speaker output is. Based on the recent leaks, you can see that the new Nest Home speaker will look like… well – a flattened HomePod? We’ll update you more on the specs in the near future. Stay tuned!

In the meantime, Don’t Hate Automate.

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